190 Stock Knife

J.A. Henckels is a Solingen, Germany based knife manufacturer that dates back to 1731. The company's Zwilling (twin) logo is known to be one of the oldest trademarks in the world. Throughout the company's history, it has made some of the world's finest pocket knives, kitchen knives, scissors & flatwear. In 1960 Henckels ceased their pocket knife production and started having other companies make knives for them on contract. Boker has been one of the main producers of more recent Henckels products.
Drygulch
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190 Stock Knife

Postby Drygulch » Wed Feb 27, 2019 7:54 pm

J.A. Henckels 190 “Premium Stock Knife”

Found this organizing my knives this weekend, I had traded some razors for it last year. It’s a very solid heavy knife, about 4 inches long. Looks well loved. I think the scales are stag, but very pocket worn if so. If not, bone. I know Henckels quit making pocket knives in 1960. How do I know of this is before or after that time period? Anyone have any other info on it?
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kootenay joe
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Re: 190 Stock Knife

Postby kootenay joe » Thu Feb 28, 2019 11:16 am

Dg, i have collected Henckels for quite a few years and your question: "I know Henckels quit making pocket knives in 1960. How do I know of this is before or after that time period?" is key to collecting this brand and very hard to figure out.
Henckels made knives tend to have thicker stock used for master blades. During the early post 1960's the Henckels contract knives were of Henckels patterns. I think Henckels might have supplied the parts and maybe handle covers as well. At some point the Henckels contract knives became the same patterns as made by the contract company (Boker ??), i.e. they were the manufacturer's knives re-branded as "Henckels". These are fairly easy to spot.
Older Henckels have no pattern numbers. So are the Henckels pattern knives with a pattern number the early contract knives ? Possibly but it is just my conjecture, i have never read this posted by anyone else.
Henckels used distinctive looking stag and jigged bone, which they called "Patent Stag" so this can be helpful in ID'ing Henckels' made knives but might also be on the early contract knives.
Your knife has Henckels stag but worn down. As it has a pattern number it was either made by Henckels in the years just before 1960 or a contract knife made soon after 1960.
Note: the idea that pattern numbers likely indicate a contract knife and that in the first few years after 1960 contract knives were of Henckels patterns and Henckels parts, is all my conjecture. It might not be correct.
kj

Drygulch
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Joined: Sat Feb 23, 2019 11:47 pm
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Re: 190 Stock Knife

Postby Drygulch » Sun Mar 03, 2019 2:38 pm

kootenay joe wrote:Dg, i have collected Henckels for quite a few years and your question: "I know Henckels quit making pocket knives in 1960. How do I know of this is before or after that time period?" is key to collecting this brand and very hard to figure out.
Henckels made knives tend to have thicker stock used for master blades. During the early post 1960's the Henckels contract knives were of Henckels patterns. I think Henckels might have supplied the parts and maybe handle covers as well. At some point the Henckels contract knives became the same patterns as made by the contract company (Boker ??), i.e. they were the manufacturer's knives re-branded as "Henckels". These are fairly easy to spot.
Older Henckels have no pattern numbers. So are the Henckels pattern knives with a pattern number the early contract knives ? Possibly but it is just my conjecture, i have never read this posted by anyone else.
Henckels used distinctive looking stag and jigged bone, which they called "Patent Stag" so this can be helpful in ID'ing Henckels' made knives but might also be on the early contract knives.
Your knife has Henckels stag but worn down. As it has a pattern number it was either made by Henckels in the years just before 1960 or a contract knife made soon after 1960.
Note: the idea that pattern numbers likely indicate a contract knife and that in the first few years after 1960 contract knives were of Henckels patterns and Henckels parts, is all my conjecture. It might not be correct.
kj

Thanks, KJ. Any links to pictures of this knife style and the stag in no so worn condition?

kootenay joe
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Re: 190 Stock Knife

Postby kootenay joe » Sun Mar 03, 2019 2:59 pm

I will have a look and will post pics if i do have a better example.
kj

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Re: 190 Stock Knife

Postby Landersknives » Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:18 pm

Drygulch wrote:
kootenay joe wrote:Dg, i have collected Henckels for quite a few years and your question: "I know Henckels quit making pocket knives in 1960. How do I know of this is before or after that time period?" is key to collecting this brand and very hard to figure out.
Henckels made knives tend to have thicker stock used for master blades. During the early post 1960's the Henckels contract knives were of Henckels patterns. I think Henckels might have supplied the parts and maybe handle covers as well. At some point the Henckels contract knives became the same patterns as made by the contract company (Boker ??), i.e. they were the manufacturer's knives re-branded as "Henckels". These are fairly easy to spot.
Older Henckels have no pattern numbers. So are the Henckels pattern knives with a pattern number the early contract knives ? Possibly but it is just my conjecture, i have never read this posted by anyone else.
Henckels used distinctive looking stag and jigged bone, which they called "Patent Stag" so this can be helpful in ID'ing Henckels' made knives but might also be on the early contract knives.
Your knife has Henckels stag but worn down. As it has a pattern number it was either made by Henckels in the years just before 1960 or a contract knife made soon after 1960.
Note: the idea that pattern numbers likely indicate a contract knife and that in the first few years after 1960 contract knives were of Henckels patterns and Henckels parts, is all my conjecture. It might not be correct.
kj

Thanks, KJ. Any links to pictures of this knife style and the stag in no so worn condition?


Here are 4 examples of the 190 that I have. I hope this helps. Sorry the pictures are not that good.
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Ed
“No brag just fact”
Walter Brennan

kootenay joe
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Re: 190 Stock Knife

Postby kootenay joe » Sun Mar 03, 2019 5:33 pm

And from the appearance of the stag, all are Henckels made knives, pre 1960. Having 4 of this pattern is an accomplishment as they are not often seen. Not rare, but uncommon.
Just checked. i only have one 190 Stockman, blades rather worn down. Not really worth taking pictures.
kj


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