Work Sharp

A place to share, learn, & show off sharpening tips, tricks, techniques, & tools for sharpening edges of all kinds.
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OSCAR
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Work Sharp

Postby OSCAR » Sun Jun 02, 2019 6:39 am

I’ve used the Lansky system for years but found one I prefer. Worksharp makes a angle guided electric sharpening device that uses replaceable sandpaper belts. It is quick and grinds an edge that is perfect. Since the belts have slight give, the grind is slightly convex which leaves more steel behind the edge. I’ll use this rarely for a working knife whose edge is pretty far gone or needs restoration. For maintainance, I like the ceramic sticks at least weekly. I use Lansky. Sold with a course and fine pair of sticks for about 20 dollars, it’s hard to beat. Both devices are great for the sharpening challenged. I’ve seen similar sticks by AG Russell, Idahone and Spyderco but they all cost substantially more. If I knew one was substantially better then I’d buy it. If anyone has used the Lansky sticks and one of the other brands, I’d like to know if the others are better.
As for Work-sharp, I prefer it to either whetstones, or the Lansky guides, which take more time to use and don’t do a better job than Worksharp. It doesn’t leave scratches on the blade, and the guides make for a perfect edge every time.
The most useless thing ever is a dull knife.

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OLDE CUTLER
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby OLDE CUTLER » Fri Jun 07, 2019 12:33 am

OSCAR wrote:I’ve used the Lansky system for years but found one I prefer. Worksharp makes a angle guided electric sharpening device that uses replaceable sandpaper belts. It is quick and grinds an edge that is perfect. Since the belts have slight give, the grind is slightly convex which leaves more steel behind the edge. I’ll use this rarely for a working knife whose edge is pretty far gone or needs restoration. For maintainance, I like the ceramic sticks at least weekly. I use Lansky. Sold with a course and fine pair of sticks for about 20 dollars, it’s hard to beat. Both devices are great for the sharpening challenged. I’ve seen similar sticks by AG Russell, Idahone and Spyderco but they all cost substantially more. If I knew one was substantially better then I’d buy it. If anyone has used the Lansky sticks and one of the other brands, I’d like to know if the others are better.
As for Work-sharp, I prefer it to either whetstones, or the Lansky guides, which take more time to use and don’t do a better job than Worksharp. It doesn’t leave scratches on the blade, and the guides make for a perfect edge every time.


The problem with the Worksharp is as you mentioned it works fast. Because of that you will be grinding much more metal than you really need to when sharpening with this system and thus shortening the life of your knives. My last employer that I worked for before I retired was a contractors supply that started selling the Worksharp tools when they were first available. At a contractors show a factory rep was there to demonstrate how it worked. He would ask customers to give him their knives (he asked me for mine and I declined) and he would sharpen them. One of my coworkers had a brand new tactical tanto knife. He handed it to the guy and he used the Worksharp, the whole time telling everyone how fast it was to sharpen a knife with it. When he handed it back to the owner, it was no longer a tanto, but a skinner. The guy completely ruined the knife. Since it was the first knife he sharpened as a demo with a new model right out of the box, I made a point to look at the metal filings that he ground off the knife, and there was quite a pile! I only use the Lansky system and have had the same one since 1981. All the original stones have worn out and been replaced with the diamond stones. I used ceramic crock sticks to remove the wire edge after sharpening with the Lansky. I would prefer not to have a convex edge on my knife.
"Sometimes even the blind chicken finds corn"

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cudgee
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby cudgee » Fri Jun 07, 2019 1:20 am

OSCAR wrote:I’ve used the Lansky system for years but found one I prefer. Worksharp makes a angle guided electric sharpening device that uses replaceable sandpaper belts. It is quick and grinds an edge that is perfect. Since the belts have slight give, the grind is slightly convex which leaves more steel behind the edge. I’ll use this rarely for a working knife whose edge is pretty far gone or needs restoration. For maintainance, I like the ceramic sticks at least weekly. I use Lansky. Sold with a course and fine pair of sticks for about 20 dollars, it’s hard to beat. Both devices are great for the sharpening challenged. I’ve seen similar sticks by AG Russell, Idahone and Spyderco but they all cost substantially more. If I knew one was substantially better then I’d buy it. If anyone has used the Lansky sticks and one of the other brands, I’d like to know if the others are better.
As for Work-sharp, I prefer it to either whetstones, or the Lansky guides, which take more time to use and don’t do a better job than Worksharp. It doesn’t leave scratches on the blade, and the guides make for a perfect edge every time.

Hi, thought i might be able to help you. I have the AG Russell diamond sticks, the Idahone ceramic sticks and the Lansky ceramic sticks. I have all three because i wanted to see which one was in my opinion the best. With the $ exchange rate and postage it was not a cheap exercise, but now i have a very comprehensive sharpening set up. I have grit sizes ranging from 200 to 1500 and angles from 15 degrees through to 25 degrees. So when i have finished on the ceramic i go to a strop with green 8000 grit compound through to 1 micron diamond spray then finish on .5 micron diamond spray, and get a really good edge. The strops are cased kangaroo leather, and i do not need to go back to the sticks very often if i hone them regularly on the strops. The AG Russell is 200 grit with a 15 degree angle. The Idahone is 200 grit and 1500 grit with 15 degree and 22.5 degree angles. and you have the Lansky. A lot of factory knives have between 15-20 degree angles. If i had to pick one i would get the Idahone, it has longer sticks and you can do a range of knife sizes with it. Also this may be important to your preferences it is an All American family company, and i am on the other side of the planet and they were an absolute pleasure to do business with. Any questions i had they got straight back to me with the answers. Have a look on their website at the Learning Center, this my help answer some of your questions. Hope i have been able to help you, and not confuse you. If you want to know anything about these systems do not hesitate to contact me. Have a good week end. :)

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treefarmer
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby treefarmer » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:08 am

Just an observation on the little Work Sharp machine. I bought one several years ago and as OLDE CUTLER said it can ruin a knife right now! However thinking about his post, I would venture the one giving the demonstration had no idea of what he was doing and used the most course belt available with the little machine. They come with P80, P220 and 6000 micromesh belts. I've never used the 80 grit for anything and feel that you could ruin any knife blade you might use it on. I really like the way it will tune up an old, abused blade and I imagine if I used the 80 grit there would be metal filings as OLDE CUTLER described. The Work Sharp can be a winner or a loser, IMHO. :)
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Colonel26
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby Colonel26 » Fri Jun 07, 2019 2:40 am

I don’t have a worksharp, but I do use a 1x30 belt sander on occasion to set a bevel or clean up a badly abused blade. 120 grit is the one I usually start with, and most of the time the only grit I use.

For normal touch up, it’s a natural stone or the DMT diamond hone.
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OLDE CUTLER
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby OLDE CUTLER » Fri Jun 07, 2019 3:10 am

treefarmer wrote:Just an observation on the little Work Sharp machine. I bought one several years ago and as OLDE CUTLER said it can ruin a knife right now! However thinking about his post, I would venture the one giving the demonstration had no idea of what he was doing and used the most course belt available with the little machine. They come with P80, P220 and 6000 micromesh belts. I've never used the 80 grit for anything and feel that you could ruin any knife blade you might use it on. I really like the way it will tune up an old, abused blade and I imagine if I used the 80 grit there would be metal filings as OLDE CUTLER described. The Work Sharp can be a winner or a loser, IMHO. :)
Treefarmer

I think the people watching the demonstration assumed he knew what he was doing because he was the Worksharp Factory Rep. Probably like a lot of things, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Lol
"Sometimes even the blind chicken finds corn"

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OSCAR
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby OSCAR » Fri Jun 07, 2019 8:28 am

I almost never use my Worksharp with the 80 grit coarse belt. It is ONLY for re shaping an edge that is mostly gone. If I use it, it is one or two passes on each side. The middle belt grit sharpens great without removing a lot of metal. Again, don’t overdo it. A few passes either side. The micromesh belt, polishes the edge nicely like a leather strop.
If you take more than a few seconds (on the blade not including belt changes), you probably are removing too much metal.
I like my Worksharp. Had it for years and it even came with a dvd to instruct on proper use. Probably, those that condemn it never took the time to learn how to use it properly.
The most useless thing ever is a dull knife.

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Re: Work Sharp

Postby TazmanTom18 » Thu Jun 13, 2019 4:00 pm

I was taught by a knifemaker friend to sharpen with a belt sander(1×30 from yard sale). I've found my best belt to start with is a worn in 220. I've tried to start with 320, but not with the same results. I finish with a paper wheel with rouge. Just my take. 80 grit would scare me...

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Mumbleypeg
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby Mumbleypeg » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:27 pm

OSCAR wrote: Probably, those that condemn it never took the time to learn how to use it properly.


Well stated. Which is why I cringe every time I see a post about any type of power sharpener, regardless the brand, unless they contain a caveat that they’re for pros who know, or are willing to spend the time to learn, their proper use. I’m sure some are great in the hands of a skilled operator. Too many people buy them and ruin knives before they learn (many never do but don’t know better). But every few months we get a post here from someone “I just bought a WorkSharp, what do you think of them?” ::facepalm::

Personally I’ve never had the desire nor the need to use a power sharpener on anything other than mower blades or my bush hog shredder. Even then I often find a bastard file to be all that’s needed. Unless one has a lot of sharpening to do, power sharpeners seem to me a waste of money. Otherwise get a few stones or a Lansky-style guided sharpener and learn to use them. A useful lifelong skill! JMO

Ken
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treefarmer
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby treefarmer » Thu Jun 13, 2019 9:52 pm

Ken, if I remember correctly, the Work Sharp instructions show how to sharpen a mower blade. ::uc:: That threw me for a loop, something so small and you would need a pocket full of those little tiny belts to tune up a set of lawn mower blades. Again I'll say the Work Sharp does a wonderful job on an abused or damaged knife and it seems everyone agrees we should keep them away from anything resembling a collectible.
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FRJ
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby FRJ » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:23 am

treefarmer wrote: it seems everyone agrees we should keep them away from anything resembling a collectible.
Treefarmer



Ha! It's true. ::nod::

Pick out a knife here and tell me you want to run it on a belt sander. :shock:
Just the word "sander" gives me the shivers.
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treefarmer
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby treefarmer » Fri Jun 14, 2019 2:11 am

My, my! ::drool:: Great pile of knives, FRJ! I can see why you don't want to grind on any of them with a Work Sharp.
Treefarmer

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OSCAR
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Re: Work Sharp

Postby OSCAR » Fri Jun 14, 2019 9:48 am

I use my Worksharp ONLY on EDC knives that I work with not high end collectible knives, which I don’t use or sharpen at all. And I only use it when the edge is pretty well gone. I read all instructions first. Would I use it on any knife in the above photo of that fine collection? NO. But neither would I as much as open a letter with any knife I collect. I use only my EDC as a working tool.
The Worksharp is also a working tool suited for a specific purpose. I use either Lansky guided stones or ceramic sticks for weekly maintenance of a working tools edge. Worksharp is terrific for a working knife whose edge is shot. It is way faster at creating a new edge when it is dull as a butter knife.
Each method in my opinion is suited for different purposes. Right tool for the job .....
The most useless thing ever is a dull knife.


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