Rodgers and Sons

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ObsidianEdge
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by ObsidianEdge » Mon Sep 09, 2019 7:28 pm

Some real nice ones, Roland. A lot of knife in slim form factors.
Mike Robuck

Author: "Gun Trader's Guide to Collectible Knives"

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ratlesnake75
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by ratlesnake75 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 7:40 pm

Hey Guys, Its OK to laugh at this knife, I know its a Junker buts its a neat Junker too me, lol... Hahahha
It is an Interesting part of History for Joseph Rodgers. I personally haven't seen another, So I dont know how Scarce they are. If any of you have one that is in better shape, Please post it. From my Readings this knife is a R. Rodgers & Son (Rhoda) & was made Pre 1905
Kindest Regards,
Mark
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I Buy/Sell/Trade All Vintage Antique Pocket knives from Junkers to Mint. I am Easy going, so Please shoot me a message ANYTIME!!! l Live & Breath KNIVES Everyday.

michaelspayth
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by michaelspayth » Tue Sep 10, 2019 5:33 am

Only have a couple examples to share. Oddball examples, to say the least, but the craftsmanship always impressed me in every one of their knives that I've seen, so far. It's sort of a dignified appeal that seems to only increase over time..
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kootenay joe
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by kootenay joe » Wed Sep 11, 2019 4:26 pm

Rhoda Rodgers is a new one to me. Mark you find such a wide variety of knives. Maybe you are magnetic ?
Here is one that i might have shown before somewhere in AAPK ?
3 1/4" "Her Majesty" four blade senator with sunk joints. Top of the line knife in it's day, likely 1890's.
kj
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galvanic1882
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by galvanic1882 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 4:34 pm

Man I love that knife Roland!!!! ::tu:: :mrgreen:

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ratlesnake75
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by ratlesnake75 » Wed Sep 11, 2019 5:01 pm

Wonderful Rodgers knife Mr. Roland. Thank you Sir for taking the time to read about that Rhoda knife. I thought it was pretty fascinating myslef
Kindest Regards,
Mark
I Buy/Sell/Trade All Vintage Antique Pocket knives from Junkers to Mint. I am Easy going, so Please shoot me a message ANYTIME!!! l Live & Breath KNIVES Everyday.

Corso
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Re: Rodgers and Sons

Post by Corso » Tue Oct 01, 2019 7:35 pm

ratlesnake75 wrote:Hey Guys, Its OK to laugh at this knife, I know its a Junker buts its a neat Junker too me, lol... Hahahha
It is an Interesting part of History for Joseph Rodgers. I personally haven't seen another, So I dont know how Scarce they are. If any of you have one that is in better shape, Please post it. From my Readings this knife is a R. Rodgers & Son (Rhoda) & was made Pre 1905
Kindest Regards,
Mark
Nice knife but I've read that R. Rodgers & Son (Rhoda) and Rodgers and Sons were different companies

I picked this info up a while back - appologies I don't recall who the original author is as I got it off a closed forum and don't know even if they were the original author. So appologies for not being able to give them credit for the research.

There were probably even more but these were the ones I took note of

George Rodgers, 150 Broad Lane. In 1849, G. Rodgers was listed as a spring knife and razor manufacturer in Edward Street, with a house in Broad Lane.

George Rodgers & Company. This cutler advertised in the Sheffield directory of 1839.

John Rodgers & Sons. The name first appears in a Sheffield directory, 1849, as a table and spring knife manufacturer in Bridge Street.
An interesting sidelight is thrown on John Rodgers's history by a legal case, which was launched in about 1840 by Joseph Rodgers & Sons. The latter took Nowill to court for infringing its name by selling knives stamped "J.Rodgers & Sons", with V(crown)R. According to Joseph Rodgers & Sons, the firm of "John Rodgers & Sons" never existed.

Joseph Rodgers & Company. According to trade advertisement, this company was founded in 1800 (through that may refer to the granting of its "3436" trademark). The name doesn't appear in Sheffield directories until 1871, when the firm of Joseph Rodgers was listed as a spring knife manufacturer at No.29 Norfolk Street. In that directory it was described as "successor to John Rodgers & Sons".

5. R.Rodgers & Sons. This business, which was formed after the death of C.W.Rodgers in 1860, should not be confused with Richard Rodgers & Son. The "R" denotes Rhoda, who inherited the enterprise after the death of her husband.

Richard Rodgers & Sons. In 1841, Richard Henry Rodgers (aged 58) and his son of the same name (aged 20) were spring knife cutlers working in Porter Brook Yard.

William Rodgers.

James Rodgers - the Unwin & Rodgers trademark.

And finally Joseph Rodgers & Sons."In 1821, Joseph Rodgers and Sons secured an appointment as cutlers to His Majesty King George IV, an honor which encouraged them to greater efforts and stimulated their competitors. About that time arose the practices of scoring the top and bottom of the tang with file-cuts or flutings to keep the fingers from slipping, and of stamping the initial of the sovereign (G R, which became WR on the accession of William IV in 1830, and VR when the reign of Queen Victoria began in 1837)".

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