Some steps to replacing handles on a slipjoint

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orvet
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Postby orvet » Mon Jun 11, 2007 10:25 pm

Kaleb is right, they are peened & that is much easier to do if the knife is disassembled.
I have never seen braised pins. That would probably heat the handle material too hot and burn it.

I am working on a tutorial for you. Taking pics of my grandsons as they work. It is much easier to take pics if you aren't trying to do the work & take the pics both at the same time.

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Postby muskrat man » Tue Jun 12, 2007 1:42 am

orvet wrote:. Taking pics of my grandsons as they work. It is much easier to take pics if you aren't trying to do the work & take the pics both at the same time.

Dale


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I'm looking forward to it.

Postby dewman » Fri Jun 22, 2007 5:06 pm

orvet wrote:Kaleb is right, they are peened & that is much easier to do if the knife is disassembled.
I have never seen braised pins. That would probably heat the handle material too hot and burn it.

I am working on a tutorial for you. Taking pics of my grandsons as they work. It is much easier to take pics if you aren't trying to do the work & take the pics both at the same time.

Dale


I'm looking forward to it. I have two Camillus electricians knives at the ready, hoping to make them into a one blader. The ones I've seen on the forum really caught my eye. I have some nice ambonia wood I plan to use for the scales. If the first one goes as planned, I also have some fiddleback maple I'll use on the other.

Pictured is the ambonia. Nice stuff to work with. About the same hardness as walnut. It has a unique feature of sort of an irridescense (sp?) when you turn it on a different plane with sunlight on it.
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orvet
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Postby orvet » Fri Jun 22, 2007 7:06 pm

Nice wood ::tu::
You should see the Amboyna Burl, absolutely amazing.
Yesterday I found a new source for wood locally. I won some Koa on ebay and saw it was local. I made arrangements for local pickup. It turns out that I used to work with the guy about 10 years ago. (It's a small world, but I would hate to paint it) :mrgreen: He has some of the finest burl I have seen & a number of woods I have not heard of before.

Here is a pic of the wood I got yesterday:
The large piece on the left is stabilized Buckeye Burl, Koa on top left, Red Mallee in left center & Sepele on the bottom left.
Does anyone need a knife re-handled? :lol:

Dale
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Postby Hukk » Fri Jun 22, 2007 8:48 pm

Would that place be in Klamath Falls? I was drooling through a warehouse over there last summer. Fantastic selection and nothing like picking out your own wood. I have a piece of KOA (5A EXTRA CURLY XF lumber) coming from Klamath Falls also, along with some very nicely striped Brazilian Tulipwood.

Real nice haul Dale! ::drool:: Makes me want to be up around those exotic wood warehouses. ::tu::

P.S. That sure is a great looking piece of Buckeye, indeed one of my top 5 favorites! ::drool:: ::tu:: ::tu::
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Postby orvet » Sat Jun 23, 2007 3:14 am

Nice Hukk. ::tu:: ::drool::
This guy has a lot of instrument grade wood & exhibition grade too as he gets it in. I saw a piece of Koa that would make a guitar back.....Knock your socks off.

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Postby Edgewise » Fri Jul 13, 2007 4:23 pm

muskrat man wrote:it isn'tt mandatory to disassemble the whole knife to show pins, but to be done properly it helps, ...

Is that why the pins were not replaced?
Does this mean that, with modern hi-tech epoxy, pins are not necessary?
Or does the beauty of the scales determine whether pins are put or not?

Thanks for the insider look, agteacher2. For me, it's like a mystery being revealed. You really brought out a glow in that bois d'arc.

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do you

Postby revencer » Mon Feb 18, 2008 4:53 am

do you sand the wood all the way down to the grips shape or do you cut them down to an outline then sand? If so what do you cut?

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Re: do you

Postby orvet » Mon Feb 18, 2008 5:56 am

revencer wrote:do you sand the wood all the way down to the grips shape or do you cut them down to an outline then sand? If so what do you cut?


For me, it all depends on the knife and the handles that were on it. If I am replacing the wood handles of a Schrade LB-7 I will use wood the same thickness as the bolsters, just like on the original.
If I am doing a Stockman, I will leave the wood a bit thicker in the middle and taper it down to meet the bolsters.

I usually use the old handles as a pattern to make the new handles. Of course you have to fit the length precisely to the bolsters, but I will usually leave it wider on the sides and sand it down to fit the liner after I have glued it on.

I hope this helps,
Dale
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Re: Some steps to replacing handles on a slipjoint

Postby vikingfisher » Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:53 am

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Re: Some steps to replacing handles on a slipjoint

Postby cactus2020 » Sun Oct 05, 2008 8:38 pm

this might seem like a stupid question, but how do you hold the handles on, without pins

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Re: Some steps to replacing handles on a slipjoint

Postby jonet143 » Sun Oct 05, 2008 9:01 pm

not a stupid question, glue is the answer.
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bluerush55
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Re:

Postby bluerush55 » Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:03 am

agteacher2 wrote:Thanks Sunburst,

If I had a photographer to stand by and take the pictures of each step it would be a better turorial. I get going and forget about the camera. ::shrug::

Glad you enjoyed it!!!
Jeff

Thta was great Jeff. IM from just down the road, out by Longview airport. I was wondering what the best glue to use is?

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Re:

Postby bluerush55 » Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:09 am

orvet wrote:Nice wood ::tu::
You should see the Amboyna Burl, absolutely amazing.
Yesterday I found a new source for wood locally. I won some Koa on ebay and saw it was local. I made arrangements for local pickup. It turns out that I used to work with the guy about 10 years ago. (It's a small world, but I would hate to paint it) :mrgreen: He has some of the finest burl I have seen & a number of woods I have not heard of before.

Here is a pic of the wood I got yesterday:
The large piece on the left is stabilized Buckeye Burl, Koa on top left, Red Mallee in left center & Sepele on the bottom left.
Does anyone need a knife re-handled? :lol:

Dale

Dale is there any way we could get to know this guy with the wood????? Don G

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orvet
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Re: Some steps to replacing handles on a slipjoint

Postby orvet » Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:58 am

Don,
Here is his eBay store. http://stores.ebay.com/That-Burly-Guy
His name is Gary.

Tell him I sent you.
We used to work together.

Dale
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