Full Tang vs. other

A place to discuss sharp and pointy things from the kitchen.
cody6268
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Joined: Fri Apr 10, 2015 7:51 pm
Location: Southwestern Virginia

Full Tang vs. other

Postby cody6268 » Sun Aug 04, 2019 11:17 pm

I've seen this discussion again and again on outdoor fixed blades. Honesty, since most have a tang that goes most of the way in the handle, no matter what type it is, it works fine. I'm not one who hammers on my blades with a rock. In that case, it's not that big of a deal, but a lot of kitchen knives are built completely different. I see a lot that just have a little stub of the blade, roughly an inch, that the handle is molded or attached over. I've seen it break, especially on cheap kitchen knives from the dollar store. I mostly own Henckels (since they're one of the few non-Chinese brands of knife I find cheaply around here; especially at discount stores), and the majority are full tang. But my Radas, looking at photos on the website, have basically an inch of blade attached into the handle.

Not too bad for the "Tomato" slicer, since it's mostly a steak and paring knife, but the butcher's knife is an issue. I often use it for separating hot dogs out of the pack; in a chopping motion; which I kinda think myself is a dumb thing to do. SOrt of afraid that little piece can break off or come out. Will probably replace it in use, with a full tang Ontario. Unfortunately, carbon steel, if not taken care of, will rust. The reason I retired it is when I let my grandmother use it, it had gotten coated in rust. From then on out, it was a field knife.

So, what's everyone else's take on this topic. And does Case make a stainless Butcher?

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Dinadan
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Re: Full Tang vs. other

Postby Dinadan » Mon Aug 05, 2019 12:34 am

Most of my favorite kitchen knives have full tangs. I am talking about Henckels, Wusthof, and Mad Hungry. On the other hand, we have some Chefmate knives that are not full tang and they are pretty good too. If I see a knife that I like and it is not too expensive, the tang will not be a deciding factor. I have never had a chef knife blade break away from the handle: if that ever happens to me then I will probably not buy anything except full tang chef knives thereafter.

One thing that is kind of sad is that no new knives that I have have tapered tangs. Back in the old days some good quality knives had a tapered tang to improve balance or reduce weight. I have never seen a new knife with that feature. Here is a photo of what I am talking about. Top: Henckels, middle: Wusthof: bottom: unstamped old knife.
Attachments
Tangs.jpg
Tangs
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mrwatch
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Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: michigan

Re: Full Tang vs. other

Postby mrwatch » Mon Aug 05, 2019 9:57 am

Cody, about RADA knives. I do not own one. A man brought and sold many at the tractor shows, flea markets. I commented that they like them so well that they don't mark them. late 1990's. He said that a church group was selling them cheaper than he could buy them. Found out that they give extra discounts to non profits. quality? Never heard.

mrwatch
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Joined: Mon Oct 01, 2007 4:58 pm
Location: michigan

Re: Full Tang vs. other

Postby mrwatch » Mon Aug 05, 2019 12:04 pm

[quote="mrwatch"]Cody, about RADA knives. I do not own one. A man brought and sold many at the tractor shows, flea markets. I asked him where they are made and he wouldn't tell me. like I might go in competition. late 1990's. He said that a church group was selling them cheaper than he could buy them. Found out that they give extra discounts to non profits. quality? Never heard, site say's life time guaranteed.

stumpstalker
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Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2016 11:03 am
Location: Massachusetts

Re: Full Tang vs. other

Postby stumpstalker » Wed Aug 21, 2019 8:24 am

My belief was that tapered tang was a sign of hand-forging, which large manufacturers do not do anymore.

As for carbon steel kitchen knives: that is the only kind I use. If necessary, just keep them out of the hands of people that will not take care of them; and leave a few cheap, stainless steel knives around for amateurs to use.

Here's my totally biased opinion: In the kitchen, stainless steels knives, if they ever had a decent edge on them to begin with, it did not last long; and when they needed sharpening, it probably had to be sent out to be done correctly.

Outside of the kitchen, I only use stainless steel knives to cut synthetic materials, i.e., nylon rope.

Here's my life-long experience: pick up a stainless steel knife, any where: It's dull.


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