GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

GEC specializes in highly collectable and premium quality usable pocket knives. The company's USA manufactured knives have quickly proven to be a big hit with both collectors and users who seek quality American craftsmanship.
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby Onearmbladejunkie » Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:35 pm

The SFO #29 stockyard whittler Coffee house acrylic knives are finished and ready to be shipped out soon.
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Mumbleypeg
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby Mumbleypeg » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:16 pm

1. A "cattle knife" should have a spey blade. Unfortunately the term has come to be more based on the shape of the frame than on its original purpose. ::huff::

2. Yes, "hedgeapple" is the same tree as Osage Orange. The tree has dense orange colored wood, nearly impervious to decay, rot and insects. It was originally native to the middle part of the continental U.S. Widely prized by native Americans for use in making bows, hence its also being known as "Bois d'Arc" (wood of the bow) which was a name given the tree by French trappers who also traded with the native tribes. Because native American tribes (attributed to the Osage tribe) traded the wood and seed with other tribes the tree was spread geographically to other areas, and another of its names "Osage Orange".

However probably the biggest contributor to its spread is the trees' thorns and dense growth habit, which made it useful to farmers and homesteads as a barrier fence or "hedge row" . If planted in a solid row it becomes a near impenetrable barrier. Hence another name for the tree - "Hedge" . Farmers and ranchers also used the tree for making fence posts and for use as foundation piers for buildings. When burned the wood has extremely high BTU but it also pops and throws off sparks/cinders so needs a good screen or enclosure.

Following the Depression Era "dustbowl" the U.S. government promoted planting of the tree in rows as shelter belts from wind. Female trees bear fruit which is round pale green and softball-sized. Hence another name for the tree is "hedgeapple" . Although not a preferred food for livestock, horses and cattle will sometimes eat the fruit which gave it yet another common name, "Horse Apple".

Same tree, many uses, many names. More than you wanted to know I suspect. And it does make nice knife handle covers. Should be near-indestructible. ::tu::

Ken
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby doglegg » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:22 pm

Mumbleypeg wrote:1. A "cattle knife" should have a spey blade. Unfortunately the term has come to be more based on the shape of the frame than on its original purpose. ::huff::

2. Yes, "hedgeapple" is the same tree as Osage Orange. The tree has dense orange colored wood, nearly impervious to decay, rot and insects. It was originally native to the middle part of the continental U.S. Widely prized by native Americans for use in making bows, hence its also being known as "Bois d'Arc" (wood of the bow) which was a name given the tree by French trappers who also traded with the native tribes. Because native American tribes (attributed to the Osage tribe) traded the wood and seed with other tribes the tree was spread geographically to other areas, and another of its names "Osage Orange".

However probably the biggest contributor to its spread is the trees' thorns and dense growth habit, which made it useful to farmers and homesteads as a barrier fence or "hedge row" . If planted in a solid row it becomes a near impenetrable barrier. Hence another name for the tree - "Hedge" . Farmers and ranchers also used the tree for making fence posts and for use as foundation piers for buildings. When burned the wood has extremely high BTU but it also pops and throws off sparks/cinders so needs a good screen or enclosure.

Following the Depression Era "dustbowl" the U.S. government promoted planting of the tree in rows as shelter belts from wind. Female trees bear fruit which is round pale green and softball-sized. Hence another name for the tree is "hedgeapple" . Although not a preferred food for livestock, horses and cattle will sometimes eat the fruit which gave it yet another common name, "Horse Apple".

Same tree, many uses, many names. More than you wanted to know I suspect. And it does make nice knife handle covers. Should be near-indestructible. ::tu::

Ken

Ken, what an informative piece. I've known Bois d'Arc trees all my life and now I know the why in their name. Horse apples make good targets. ::handshake::

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby kootenay joe » Sun Aug 18, 2019 12:01 am

Thanks Ken. Not more than i wanted to know but more than i knew there was to know. All very interesting. The pictures of the #29 with this wood make it look rather plain and not interesting. Likely better in person when you can see the grain. Vintage USA knives with wood handles are either ebony or cocobolo. Wonder why Osage Orange was not used as it is a native USA tree and likely easier to obtain and cheaper to buy.
I would like to get some seeds and see if they can survive in Southern B.C. now that our winters have become rather mild.
kj

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby doglegg » Sun Aug 18, 2019 12:33 am

kootenay joe wrote:Thanks Ken. Not more than i wanted to know but more than i knew there was to know. All very interesting. The pictures of the #29 with this wood make it look rather plain and not interesting. Likely better in person when you can see the grain. Vintage USA knives with wood handles are either ebony or cocobolo. Wonder why Osage Orange was not used as it is a native USA tree and likely easier to obtain and cheaper to buy.
I would like to get some seeds and see if they can survive in Southern B.C. now that our winters have become rather mild.
kj

Roland, some people consider them 'weed' trees as they are so thorny and so messy. They produce a lot of their 'fruit' that has a milky issue when bruised and they rot on the ground. You might not want them after they start. IMO.

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby kootenay joe » Sun Aug 18, 2019 3:10 am

I have an area i call my 'arboretum' or Tree Garden and i have a number of different deciduous species in there. It is not right by the house or sheds or parking. Horse Chestnuts also have a spiny outer casing as do Chestnuts (Castanea). If the O.O. will grow here it would fit right in with the other 'spiney droppers'.
kj

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby Mumbleypeg » Sun Aug 18, 2019 5:40 am

Bois d'Arc wood was once used for agricultural tool handles. Of recent it has been used for knife handles - not sure why it hasn't been used more for that purpose. Here's a couple of recent knives from Moore Maker and Case showing the wood's appearance. I'd expect due to its hardness it would take a good polished appearance and become even better with handling. ::shrug:: I would also expect the bois d'Arc handles on GEC knives to look similar.
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Just for fun here's an interesting and somewhat whimsical article I found about the tree http://www.phoenixcommotion.com/informa ... arc-trees/

Ken
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby JohnR » Sun Aug 18, 2019 11:19 am

Really liking this pattern, a 3 spring knife that is no wider than a lot of 2 spring knives.
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby kootenay joe » Sun Aug 18, 2019 3:45 pm

I guess you do like this pattern as you have 5 already. To me the Tidioute in Osage Orange wood looks too 'plain': bolsters not grooved, no swages on blades, plain shield and plain looking wood. The others all have details that add interest to how they look. For example the acrylic Tidioute has color and swirls in the handles, etc.
Does anyone else also feel the Osage Orange just looks too 'plain' ?
kj

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby FarSide » Sun Aug 18, 2019 11:48 pm

kootenay joe wrote:I guess you do like this pattern as you have 5 already. To me the Tidioute in Osage Orange wood looks too 'plain': bolsters not grooved, no swages on blades, plain shield and plain looking wood. The others all have details that add interest to how they look. For example the acrylic Tidioute has color and swirls in the handles, etc.
Does anyone else also feel the Osage Orange just looks too 'plain' ?
kj

Osage Orange was the only one I wanted. I think the character of the wood & the satin bolsters go well together. My covers have a nice dark grain that stands put over all the other aspects of the knife. I’m almost staying away from Northfield’s because of the polished blades. Just my tastes changing I guess.

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby RalphAlsip » Mon Aug 19, 2019 10:55 pm

I received my Tidioute example today and I like it. Fit & finish is good, size is good, pulls and snap are good for my preference, and there doesn't appear to be any blade rubbing that is apparent from the few times I have opened and closed the blades. When I learned it was a 3 backspring knife I was concerned it would be too thick relative to the length, but it feels very balanced and well proportioned. The blades still have the oil on them.
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby FarSide » Tue Aug 20, 2019 3:40 am

RalphAlsip wrote:I received my Tidioute example today and I like it. Fit & finish is good, size is good, pulls and snap are good for my preference, and there doesn't appear to be any blade rubbing that is apparent from the few times I have opened and closed the blades. When I learned it was a 3 backspring knife I was concerned it would be too thick relative to the length, but it feels very balanced and well proportioned. The blades still have the oil on them.

Sure like the coloring on those.

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby Onearmbladejunkie » Tue Aug 20, 2019 11:29 am

I received an e-mail yesterday . A second batch was now available. Burnt Sienna jigged bone #29 $114.01 , free slip , Free shipping. I just had to jump on it.
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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby kootenay joe » Thu Aug 22, 2019 12:43 am

I am hoping i might get lucky and manage to score the Northfield version with stag handles. I have not bought any of the Stockyard Whittler releases so far as i can only buy one. The stag ones will be the 'final inning' so if i strike out there, i am totally out except for secondary market.
kj

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Re: GEC#29 Stockyard Whittler knife 2019

Postby Sharpnshinyknives » Thu Aug 22, 2019 1:00 am

kootenay joe wrote:I am hoping i might get lucky and manage to score the Northfield version with stag handles. I have not bought any of the Stockyard Whittler releases so far as i can only buy one. The stag ones will be the 'final inning' so if i strike out there, i am totally out except for secondary market.
kj


I have a second bone handled one that I would sell you at cost if you don’t score the one that you like. I ordered one from KSF thinking I didn’t have one on reserve at Ck. And guess what, I did.
SSk (Mark)
“As iron sharpens iron, so one man sharpens another.” Proverbs


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