Taking Apart A Slip Joint

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orvet
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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by orvet » Thu May 07, 2009 2:43 am

If you were just looking for a pic of a Swinden type knife apart, with rivets intact, then I also have such a pic.

Note:
It was a Muskrat pattern, 77OT, with a broken blade.

Hope this helps,
Dale
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DaveT63
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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by DaveT63 » Mon May 11, 2009 10:59 am

orvet wrote:If you were just looking for a pic of a Swinden type knife apart, with rivets intact, then I also have such a pic.

Note:
It was a Muskrat pattern, 77OT, with a broken blade.

Hope this helps,
Dale
Dale,
I'm not ANYWHERE NEAR ready to start working on folders myself yet, but I'm now curious. I may be missing something, though, which would not be surprising. My question is, how do you use your method of using a razor blade to take apart a slipjoint, WITHOUT cutting the swinden key? Is there a particular place to run the razor, like between a bolster and liner, or do you only go so far and then it comes apart? I'm especially curious about this on a knife like the 77OT you posted here, since it has blades on both ends.

Thanks,

Dave

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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by orvet » Mon May 11, 2009 3:29 pm

Excellent question Dave.
If I am going to take a part a Swinden type knife and want to put it back together using the Swinden rivets, the process is entirely different.

A- Using a small flat file, carefully file the dome of the rocker pin flat so you can locate the center.

B- Using a spring-loaded punch locate the center of the pin and peen a center mark that is fairly deep.

C- Using a small burr or very small drill bit, drill deeply into the pin so that the hole goes down the shaft of the pin. Keep in mind on a Swinden knife the rocker pin is probably 3/32" in diameter. When I drill down the shaft I normally use a 1/16" drill.

D- Using a larger burr that is approximately the size of the head on the pin, grind down the pin head.

E- This next step is a bit tricky as it requires three hands or more. Open all the blades of the knife & compress the backsprings using a vice or a Camillus type knife vice to compress the spring, the Camillus type knife vice is the easiest way to do this and less likely to damage your knife.
Note -- Camillus type knife vice & usage: http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com/kni ... 38&t=10069

F- Insert the 1/16” pin punch into the 1/16" hole you have drilled in the pin and drive the pin out of the knife.

G- Grasping the handles and bolsters on one side, turn it counterclockwise until it comes loose, approximately 5° of turn in the counterclockwise direction.

If I'm in a hurry and I am going to replace the handle material on the knife anyway, I use a rotary tool, (such as a Dremel or Foredom), and a burr; to grind the head off the rocker pin. Then I go directly to step E.

The only reason I can think of to keep the Swinden key system intact is if I were going to replace the handle material and reassemble the knife using the Swinden key system. I have done this quite successfully, however if there needs to be any repair work done or blades replaced the Swinden rivets must be cut and the knife converted to pin-through-bolster construction.

I hope this answered your questions,
Dale
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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by RandyFew » Wed Feb 01, 2012 1:59 pm

I cut into an Ulster boy scout knife recently to get a spring for another knife. I encountered this swinden pin system. Did schrade make any knives for ulster, or did ulster use this system too? I was going to make a single folder out of this knife. I guess that I will need to drill out the bolsters. ::dang::
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orvet
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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by orvet » Wed Feb 01, 2012 3:53 pm

RandyFew wrote:I cut into an Ulster boy scout knife recently to get a spring for another knife. I encountered this swinden pin system. Did schrade make any knives for ulster, or did ulster use this system too? I was going to make a single folder out of this knife. I guess that I will need to drill out the bolsters. ::dang::
Randy,
The easy part of this question is drilling the bolster. Figure out the right diameter of drill bit to use, put the drill bit at the top of the narrow part of the keyhole and drill.
It is pretty easy actually.

It is much more difficult to answer the question, "Did Schrade make Ulster or did Ulster make Schrade? The Short Version: Albert Baer purchased Ulster in 1941. In 1946 he purchased Schrade Cutlery Co and renamed it Schrade Walden. In 1958 Schrade and Ulster moved their production to Ellenville New York. About 1962 Schrade started using the Swinden Key System; they were the only company to use that system. After 1958 Ulster knives were made in the Schrade factory, and Schrade started using the Swinden Key machinery to manufacture knives. They used it on the Ulster knives as well as on Schrade. The official end of Ulster knives was about 1972, though there were some knives made under the Ulster brand as late as 1985, these were made in the Camillus factory, also owned by Albert Baer.

If you read the post I made at the end of the following thread it will give you more information and some links to additional information on Swinden Key knives.

http://www.allaboutpocketknives.com/kni ... y&start=30

I hope this helps.
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RandyFew
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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by RandyFew » Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:08 pm

Thanks Dale! The more I do with this knife hobby, I learn something new with each knife.
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TinyDee
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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by TinyDee » Tue May 21, 2013 10:25 pm

Now so long ago but I am just trying to find these tools. I want the Camilus vise and where do you find a razor like that. That is necessary to take a pocket knife apart I think. I just do not know where to find any of this. But I do want to know...

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Re: Taking Apart A Slip Joint

Post by orvet » Wed May 22, 2013 7:37 am

TinyDee wrote:Now so long ago but I am just trying to find these tools. I want the Camilus vise and where do you find a razor like that. That is necessary to take a pocket knife apart I think. I just do not know where to find any of this. But I do want to know...
David,
check your email.
I just sent you a couple links.
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