Winchester & 110 repairs

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Reverand
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Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by Reverand »

I made time to spend out in the knife shop today - the first time in about a month.

I finished up this 1992 Winchester 2078 Doctor's knife that Jerryd2818 gifted to me last year in our POS exchange. It had outgassed. I made a mark-side liner for it, and rehandled it in acrylic that almost matches the original cracked-ice celluloid. The blades are still a bit discolored, but mainly because I wanted to retain the etch. The shield looked better before every flaw got filled up with polishing compound! I am still very pleased with it though.
Winchester before
Winchester before
Winchester after
Winchester after
The second knife is this badly scratched Buck 110 that I bought at a knife show a couple of weeks ago. These knives are so beefy that I could sand out the worst of the marks and still have plenty of knife left! The rivets are no longer domed, and I had to round out the edges a bit, but I actually prefer the way it feels now.
Buck 110 before
Buck 110 before
Buck 110 before - pile side
Buck 110 before - pile side
Buck 110 - after
Buck 110 - after
Buck 110 after - pile sidel
Buck 110 after - pile sidel
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herbva
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by herbva »

Those two look like really interesting and fun projects Reverand, and both are great saves! What you did with each is absolutely amazing! ::tu:: ::tu::

P.S. I have the same problem with used polishing compound (after it turns black) finding its way into the spaces and crevices, like around a shield and where the bolsters meet the scales. One solution that I discovered is using a Q-tip soaked in rubbing alcohol and push down really hard when you go over the spots where the compound has accumulated. Pushing down hard forces the cotton down into the space you want to clean out and the alcohol dissolves, or at least softens the compound enough to get it out.
"Better to do something imperfectly, than to do nothing flawlessly." ~ Robert H. Schuller

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OLDE CUTLER
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by OLDE CUTLER »

Reverand wrote: Sun Feb 18, 2024 4:37 am I made time to spend out in the knife shop today - the first time in about a month.

I finished up this 1992 Winchester 2078 Doctor's knife that Jerryd2818 gifted to me last year in our POS exchange. It had outgassed. I made a mark-side liner for it, and rehandled it in acrylic that almost matches the original cracked-ice celluloid. The blades are still a bit discolored, but mainly because I wanted to retain the etch. The shield looked better before every flaw got filled up with polishing compound! I am still very pleased with it though.
IMG_1077.jpegIMG_1068.jpeg

The second knife is this badly scratched Buck 110 that I bought at a knife show a couple of weeks ago. These knives are so beefy that I could sand out the worst of the marks and still have plenty of knife left! The rivets are no longer domed, and I had to round out the edges a bit, but I actually prefer the way it feels now.
IMG_1073.jpegIMG_1074.jpegIMG_1069.jpegIMG_1070.jpeg
That Winchester turned out great. The 110 looks great too. You actually did what I was contemplating with the LB7 I pictured in another post. The divots in the LB 7 are quite deep, so I elected not to flat sand the sides and contour the rest. Do you think flat sanding the sides will affect the pin retention?
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by Fisher Cat »

Nice work on both knives Reverend! You are right that the acrylic really matches the original look well. IMO, the remaining pitting and buffing compound make it look more "old timey" and less like a bright & shiny restoration. FWIW, I've also had good results getting rid of excess compound and crud using herbva's alchohol and Q-tip method. Sometimes you can also "plow" it out of crevices using the corner edge of a thick piece of paper (Post-It Notes usually work well for me).

I'm not sure I'd like to hear the story of what happened to that Buck knife, but it looks great now. I'd like to see its new thickness profile. - John
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by FRJ »

Reverand wrote: Sun Feb 18, 2024 4:37 am I made time to spend out in the knife shop today - the first time in about a month.
Very nice cleanup on those two knives, Reverand. ::tu:: ::tu::
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by ThatWeirdKnifeGuy »

2 top notch sermons delivered from the pulpit at the church of old knives.

Amen, Reverand.
::nod:: https://newlifeknives.etsy.com ::nod::

That's my Etsy store where I sell old knives and sometimes handmade knife accessories to support my knife habbit. Thanks for looking my friend. ::tu::
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orvet
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by orvet »

I like your work on the 110. I have done that myself on some that were really beat up. You're absolutely right, they have a better feel in the hand than the original. Great work!
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glennbad
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Re: Winchester & 110 repairs

Post by glennbad »

Great save on the Winchester and that Buck!
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