English Jacks show yours

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galvanic1882
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English Jacks show yours

Post by galvanic1882 »

I thought I would start a topic on one of my favoite patterns, English Jacks. Not sure why they are called that need to read levine's again but here are mine. All are stamped with a New York stamp except the Torrey at the end. From left to right, Prentiss, Genco, Levering A-1, E. Felsenheld, Cattaraugus, Utica Salesman Sample, Robeson Salesman Sample, Terrier and Torrey.
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thawk
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by thawk »

Great showing of very gorgeous vintage NY jack knives. Some real lookers there. Thank you. Wish I had some like that to show. I'm not familiar (fairly new to collecting) with some of the names there. Utica, Cattaraugus, and Robeson yes, but the others, no. They look much like other US well made knives from the early 1900's. Would be interesting to know if those other names were manufacturers or jobbers. Always fun to learn about those older companies. Will add info if found.

GENEVA CUTLERY COMPANY, GENEVA, NY
c 1902-1935
Originally formed to manufacture steel shears, the company was reorganized in 1902, such that pocket knives and straight razors replaced shears on most of the production lines. By 1912, Geneva was the single largest maker of straight razors in the US. In 1935, the company was sold to the Edward Katzinger Company of Chicago. However, early the next year, the straight razor division and their most popular trademark “Genco” were sold to W.R. Case & Sons of Bradford, PA. Some other trademarks used by Geneva included “Old Dutch”, “De Roma”, and “Seneca Chief”.

Terrier Cutlery Company Knives
Terrier was a premium brand made and distributed by Robeson between 1910 and 1916, just a six year period. However, it was during the time that Robeson was considered one of the two best knife manufacturers in America, and one of the best in the world. The only other American maker that compared was New York Knife Company in Walden, New York.
Really nice Terriers are difficult to find.
http://www.robesonsrme.com/page10.html

TORREY RAZOR CO
Worcester, Massachusetts
ca 1858 - 1963
Hal
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Sauconian »

WOW ! Mike, Thanks for sharing those.

Unfortunately the only English Jack I have is a modern one, but I may have to expand my quest for knives across the State Line. :lol:

Looking at these has made me think about my evolving preferences in vintage knives. While many collectors treasure pieces with pearl or stag handles, I'm attracted more and more to the skill and artistry of hand jigged bone. ::ds::

Fran
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by lt632ret »

Here is a Schrade Cut English jack. This is a very nice pattern and one of the more rare. That is a beautiful grouping Mike. Fran I do not remember if I thanked you for the picture you sent I have been a bit busy so thankyou. Eric gave it to me and it is now part of that display group . LT
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by muskrat man »

nice ones folks unfortunately this is one pattern I don't have.
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Sauconian »

Well I learned something here again today. I went back to my Levine's Guide for a definition of English Jack and I do have one ! An Edw.K.Tryon, Philadelphia, shown before, for opinions of the maker.

Fran

You're welcome LT
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Froggyedge »

Galvanic1882,
Great knives! ::tu::
Sauconian wrote:Well I learned something here again today. I went back to my Levine's Guide for a definition of English Jack and I do have one !
And what exactly is that definition..?

When I hear “English Jack” I get pictures in my head, but I don't know for sure what distinctions to look for…
Knivlaus mann er livlaus mann.

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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Another Knife Collector »

Those are some real nice ones fellows. Definately not a kind you see everyday. ::tu::

Blade's Guide To Knives and Their Values says an English jack is a deluxe large size (over 4in.) slim regular or sleeveboard jack knife. They often have fancy bolsters, premium handle materials and locking master blades. It later says they got their name because most large jack knives in the 18th and 19th centuries imported from England fit the definition. It's a good book to have, I would recommend it.

Here's my rather plain old Holley english jack. :)
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-Phil
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by upnorth »

Mike, that's truly a beautiful collection. Nice condition, rare knives; collector's Heaven!
Here are a few more to see; a Schrade Cut, a Schrade Walden, and a modern Schatt. All are a hair over 4 1/2".
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by upnorth »

We posted at the same time, AKC! There is nothing plain about having a Holley English Jack!! Outstanding rare knife!!
Utopia!! A chicken in every pot!! And a Barlow in every pocket!!!


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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by thawk »

Would the 5" "Daddy Barlow" pattern fit into this category? They have a longer bolster and no cap, but seem to fit the description. Just curious.
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Froggyedge »

Another Knife Collector wrote:Blade's Guide To Knives and Their Values says an English jack is a deluxe large size (over 4in.) slim regular or sleeveboard jack knife. They often have fancy bolsters, premium handle materials and locking master blades. It later says they got their name because most large jack knives in the 18th and 19th centuries imported from England fit the definition. It's a good book to have, I would recommend it.
Thanks for the info!

I've seen Blade's Guide advertised and I will get a copy. What's the connection between Levine's Guide and Blade's Guide..? Nearly the same name... I've got a copy of Levine's Guide somewhere…

Great old knife! ::tu::
Knivlaus mann er livlaus mann.

A knifeless man is a lifeless man - Old Nordic proverb.
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Froggyedge »

thawk wrote:Would the 5" "Daddy Barlow" pattern fit into this category? They have a longer bolster and no cap, but seem to fit the description. Just curious.
I guess the Daddy Barlow is not called an English Jack mainly because this distinct pattern has a name of its own… ::hmm::
Knivlaus mann er livlaus mann.

A knifeless man is a lifeless man - Old Nordic proverb.
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by stockman »

Three what I think are English Jacks The center is a old vintage Remington the other two
are Challenge. I hope you can work with the pictures.

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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Another Knife Collector »

upnorth wrote:There is nothing plain about having a Holley English Jack!! Outstanding rare knife!!
upnorth wrote: Thanks upnorth, I wish I could find more in the condition of your Schrades, they're great! :shock: ::tu::

Stockman, that single bolster Challenge shure is a beauty! :D
Froggyedge wrote:What's the connection between Levine's Guide and Blade's Guide..? Nearly the same name... I've got a copy of Levine's Guide somewhere…
I don't have a copy of Levine's yet so I'm not sure what connection there may be. ::shrug::
thawk wrote:Would the 5" "Daddy Barlow" pattern fit into this category? They have a longer bolster and no cap, but seem to fit the description. Just curious.
I think the only thing that seperates that catagories is bolster length. (maybe the daddy barlows would be another good topic to start ::tu:: )
-Phil
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Another Knife Collector »

Too many quotes, sorry for the confusion. ::shrug::
-Phil
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by upnorth »

Perfectly understandable! And I agree that Daddy's should be in their own category!
Utopia!! A chicken in every pot!! And a Barlow in every pocket!!!


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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by galvanic1882 »

That was fun so I think I will do it again next week with another pattern. Thanks for all who posted either with their knives or comments on the ones posted. That Holley is a great knife for sure.

Mike
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Froggyedge »

Please do so! :D

The Jacks from Robeson and Terrier have some quite special jigging with those “grooves”..? What's the story?
Knivlaus mann er livlaus mann.

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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by upnorth »

The contrasting deeper longer jig or groove, is often called a "worm groove" because of its length, and random appearance, I believe. It was a tradition with Cattaraugus, and others from time to time. It helped "bone stag" (jigged bone) look more like stag as well as whatever unknown reasons created it/them. Now it is a prized feature on old knives.
Utopia!! A chicken in every pot!! And a Barlow in every pocket!!!


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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by galvanic1882 »

Way to go upnorth.

By the way I love the Ulster's that you keep posting. I don't have any in my collection and wish I had a nice one. Thought I had an etched Cattle Knife a few months ago on ebay but was out bid.
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by upnorth »

Was it Eric who outbid you on that one?
Utopia!! A chicken in every pot!! And a Barlow in every pocket!!!


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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by galvanic1882 »

I don't know Eric but the high bidder was lizard1123. He also out bid me on a horn handled jack a few weeks ago.
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Sauconian »

upnorth wrote:Was it Eric who outbid you on that one?


:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: English Jacks show yours

Post by Froggyedge »

upnorth wrote:The contrasting deeper longer jig or groove, is often called a "worm groove" because of its length, and random appearance, I believe. It was a tradition with Cattaraugus, and others from time to time. It helped "bone stag" (jigged bone) look more like stag as well as whatever unknown reasons created it/them. Now it is a prized feature on old knives.
Thanks very much for the info! :D
Knivlaus mann er livlaus mann.

A knifeless man is a lifeless man - Old Nordic proverb.
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